GPF Cookbook : Main Courses

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GPF Cookbook : Main Courses

Postby Shadowydreamer on Wed May 12, 2004 10:13 am

Here's Shady's bow of appreciation to New Zealand. ^_^

Serves 4 people

Ingredients:
4 lamb shanks (about 1 lb. each) -- when buying your lamb from a butcher, ask for the shank to be cut in half
2 field tomatoes
2 cloves garlic
2 tbsp. oil
1 tbsp. flour
salt
freshly ground pepper
3 cups stock (lamb or beef)
4 pearl onions
4 baby carrots
4 baby turnips
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Postby kmd on Thu May 13, 2004 5:20 am

I got this recipe at our wedding shower. In the invitations everyone got a card to write a recipe on. I think the funniest was from my cousin Carrie, who gave me a recipe for tacos that consisted of "Get in car, drive to Taco Bell, buy tacos!" This one is from a friend of my mom's, out of all the recipes I got that day, I've used this one the most.

Spiced Pork Chops

1/2 cup all purpose flour
1 1/2 tsp. garlic powder
1 1/2 tsp. ground mustard
1 1/2 tsp. paprika
1/2 tsp. celery salt
1/4 tsp. ground ginger
1/8 tsp. oregano
1/8 tsp. basil
1/8 tsp. salt and pepper
4 pork loin chops (I've used 2 before, I've used bone-in chops, doesn't matter)
1 to 2 tbsp oil
1 cup ketchup
1 cup water
1/4 cup brown sugar

Preheat your oven at 350
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Postby blondeGeek? on Fri May 14, 2004 10:00 am

Mmmmm.....both of these recipes sound so good, I'm going to have to try them.
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Postby blondeGeek? on Sun May 16, 2004 7:18 am

Here is a really good recipe that tastes wonderful, is good for you and is quick and easy enough to make after working all day. I can't take credit for it, tho. I got it off of a web site (I think Body for Life, but not certain). It has become one of our favorites.

Baked Chicken Parmesan with Spinach Pasta

2 skinless, boneless chicken breast halves
2 egg whites
1 bag/box of spinach or whole wheat pasta
bread crumbs
your favorite pasta sauce
Parmesan cheese, freshly grated, of course (I don't think it would be near as good with the dehydrated, powdered stuff)

Preheat oven to 400
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warm fish salad

Postby mouse on Sun May 16, 2004 11:46 am

ok, since i'm home - here's one to help us all recover from the cookies. this is from "the minimalist" column in the new york times - he's been coming up with some nice easy fish recipes. this one is easy to work variations on, and it's really quick.

time: 10 minutes

2 T peanut or olive oil
2 fish fillets, ~3/8 lb each (any firm thick fish - cod, halibut, swordish, salmon)
3 T soy sauce
3 T mirin (or 2 T honey or sugar)
2 T vinegar (preferably black Chinese vinegar)
2 T sesame oil
black pepper
6 c mesclun (spring mix), washed and dried

Mix soy sauce, mirin, vinegar and sesame oil with 1/4 tsp pepper and 1/4 c water in a bowl.

Put a nonstick skillet that can be covered over high heat and add the oil; a minute later, add the fish and cover the pan. Cook about 3 minutes. Carefully remove the cover and add liquid mixture. Cover again and turn the heat to medium. Cook until fish is done, about 3 minutes more. Turn off heat and let sit for a moment.
Divide mesclun among 4 plates and top each portion with some fish and dressing. Grind black pepper over all and serve.

the main thing about this is the cooking technique - you can vary the dressing as much as you like. i have also used lemon juice, garlic, a bit of white wine and good olive oil, and one with orange juice, sherry and olive oil. and you can use any sort of greens - baby spinach is good too, and sometimes i throw in additional vegetables -bell pepper, tomato, etc. (the fish is also good cold - just refrigerate it in some of the dressing)
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Postby Allanon on Mon May 17, 2004 10:24 am

blondeGeek? wrote:Baked Chicken Parmesan with Spinach Pasta

(Serves two)


This sounds very good...I might have to make some tonight...although I don't have any of my homemade sauce made up...pout...Oh well, I'll have to make some and then make this again... :D

What, you say you want to know what my sauce recipe is?...Oh alright...lol...

Spaghetti (Pasta) Sauce

1-3 lb. ground meat (beef or turkey)
1 medium onion (sweet onion if available), chopped
2 12 oz cans of tomato paste
1 16 oz can of tomato sauce
1 medium red pepper, chopped
1 medium green pepper, chopped
5-7 white mushrooms, sliced
4 cloves garlic, finely chopped or pressed
2 tsp. oregano
3/4 tsp. marjoram
1 1/2 tsp. thyme
1 tsp. parsley
1 tsp. sweet basil
1/2 tsp. tarragon
1 pinch (1/16 tsp.) red pepper flakes
1 tsp. chili powder
3/4 cups sugar
1 1/2 cups red wine

Brown the meat and onion, either in a frying pan or in the final simmering pot (at least 5 quarts).

Combine all ingredients in the simmering pot or Crock Pot, stirring well so that all the spices are evenly distributed. Add just enough water to keep the sauce from "spitting". Cover and simmer using Medium-Low heat for 1 - 2 hours stirring occasionally to keep the mix from sticking/burning.

You can use it immediately, or let it stand in the fridge over night (to let the spices do their thing) and then reheat the next day. It can also be frozen for later use.

Notes:
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Postby blondeGeek? on Mon May 17, 2004 3:25 pm

Allanon wrote:

What, you say you want to know what my sauce recipe is?...Oh alright...lol...



Lol...well, now that you mention it... :wink:

I make my own sauce, too, but don't have a 'recipe' and I don't measure anything when I make mine, either, so didn't bother trying to post it. Your's sounds really good, tho. I'll just have to try it when my tomatoes get ripe. :)
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Postby kmd on Tue May 18, 2004 2:56 pm

This isn't a "main course" unless you're looking for a quick lunch. But blondeGeek? talking about tomatoes got me thinking about it, then I had some for lunch, and thought I should share.

Italian Summer Salad

Tomato (Must be fresh summer tomatoes. Pink, store bought tomatoes need not apply)
Cucumber
Green Pepper
Oil
Salt

You want about 2 times the tomato as the cucumber and pepper. Just cut them all up in a bowl. Drizzle a little oil on top (e.v.o.o., canola, whatever you've got) and shake on some salt and toss. Now, here's the key. Let this sit on the counter until everything comes to room temperature. Then you eat. If you wait for everything to get warm, the oil and salt and tomatoes form this wonderful "juice" in the bottom of the bowl, I'll admit I've made this before just to get a chance to drink the juice. It sounds simple, but the flavor is fantastic.
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Postby mouse on Tue May 18, 2004 3:40 pm

i do something similar, except adding good stale bread (a nice sourdough bagette, for example) - cut in cubes (and i add a bit of vinegar, and sweet onions, and a few herbs and the occasional avocado). ANYWAY - the bread soaks up all those lovely tomato juices and just seems to extend them.... this was sort of inspired by descriptions of an italian (i think) bread salad, and original spanish versions of gazpacho.

ok, now i'm going to be drooling for about a month waiting for the really good tomatos to come in...
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Postby Steve Rogers on Wed May 19, 2004 10:07 am

So far they all sound pretty good.

Here is one of my own cretions:

Mexican Lasagna
(Enchilada Casserole)

Ingredients:
2 Packets of taco seasoning mix
2 Cans Enchilada Sauce
1 Can Refried Beans
1 Cup Sour Cream
1 lb Ground Beef or Shredded Chicken
8 Large Flour Tortillas
Shredded Cheese (Cheddar / Mix / Personal Preference)

Preparation:
1. Brown meat, draining off fat, season with taco seasoning mix.
2. Mix can of beans with sour cream and 2/3 of 1 can of sauce.
3. Cut tortillas into thirds. There will be 3 layers of tortillas.
4. Spray nonstick cooking spray in bottom of a 9x13 baking dish.
5. Coat dish with sauce (about 1/3 of can).
6. Put first layer of tortillas (1/3) down in bottom of dish.
7. Evenly layer in the bean mixture.
8. Cover the bean layer with shredded cheese.
9. Layer in the second layer of tortillas (1/3).
10. Layer in the browned meat. (Keep a little for topping.)
11. Pour about
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Postby Steve Rogers on Wed May 19, 2004 10:12 am

And this is one of my favorites :D that Mom makes:

Elegant Chicken Breasts

1 pkg. dried beef
10 boneless chicken breasts
10 strips bacon
1 cup sour cream
1 can cream of chicken soup
4oz cream cheese(room temp)
dash tabasco sauce.

Line a greased casserole dish with dried beef. Wrap a strip of bacon around each chicken breast and arrange in casserole dish. Combine the remaining ingredients and spread over chicken. Bake 1 hour, covered at 350%. Uncover and bake until done (probably another thirty minutes).

(It has been a lot of years since I've had this one, since I have been grown and gone for a "few" years.)
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Postby Allanon on Thu May 20, 2004 5:11 am

Steve Rogers wrote:1 pkg. dried beef


I've never heard of something like this. Is it like beef jerky? If not, where to I find it in the store?

Sounds like a good receipe... :D
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Postby tbear on Thu May 20, 2004 6:53 am

Allanon wrote:
Steve Rogers wrote:1 pkg. dried beef


I've never heard of something like this. Is it like beef jerky? If not, where to I find it in the store?

Sounds like a good receipe... :D



Sometimes dried beef is also referred to as chipped beef... it is very thinly sliced beef that is salted and dried. It's usally in a plastic package in the refridgerated deli section or in a can near your canned meat products. Here is a link to one manufacterer http://www.dialcorp.com/index.cfm?page_id=122.

Chipped beef can also be put into a flour gravy and warmed through then eaten over toast. This is popular in the army and is called SOS - sh** on a shingle.. :D Good luck finding it...
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Postby Steve Rogers on Thu May 20, 2004 9:32 am

Allanon wrote:If not, where to I find it in the store?


I live in the Mid-western US. It is most often now in a little jar. It looks like a very thin dried piece of sliced lunch meat. The link from tbear shows the jar I usually see.
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Postby blondeGeek? on Thu May 20, 2004 3:33 pm

tbear wrote: Chipped beef can also be put into a flour gravy and warmed through then eaten over toast. This is popular in the army and is called SOS - sh** on a shingle.. :D Good luck finding it...


Mmmmm...I love creamed chipped beef on toast!!! Yes, my Pop and older brother (both in the Army) called it SOS. There's a great little restaurant in Dallas that serves creamed chipped beef on beer biscuits. It's delish!!!

To make a great and easy cheeseball...

Mix a pkg of chopped up chipped beef (I use Buddig) and a chopped up bunch of green onions into a package of softened cream cheese.
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Postby mouse on Thu May 20, 2004 5:03 pm

steve - sounds like the chicken one fits in nicely with the adkins diet :D

...still, it does seem to work for some people.....

(and now i, too, will be reminiscing about creamed chipped beef on toast...)
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Postby MaxJenius on Thu May 20, 2004 9:45 pm

Ack... Oh okay, here's my recipe.

Rice Curry.

Ingredients: (serves about 2 people)
Rice: 1/2 cup depending on preference. I suggest oriental rice.
Curry: 1 small pack (I recommend S&B curry)

Recommended but optional ingredients. Choose your preference, will be fine without:
1 lb meat
2 large potatos (or 4-5 small ones)
4-6 carrots
2-3 onions

Essentially stew ingredients. I like to vary this from batch to batch. I usually aim to fill the pot.

Speciality optional ingredients. These ingredients I believe sets my curry apart from standard curry.
1 tbl spoon Rice Vinegar
1 tbl spoon soy sauce.

Important. The Vinegar must NOT be White Vinegar. You can subsititute it with Wine Vinegar, but I highly recommend Rice Vinegar. Again, you can vary the amount to your preference.

Lastly, I recommend a pressure cooker. A pressure cooker can cook this meal in 30 mins.

Okay... now for the instructions.
1: Start cooking rice. The really good rice takes longer to cook than the curry, so it's a good idea to start it first.
2: Chop up your stew ingrediants and put it in the pot, fill it up with water, and let it cook. With the pressure cooker, give it 15 mins after the rocker starts to rock. A regular pot, cook until your ingrediants are soft.
3: Add curry and stir while it simmers. Curry shouldn't be soupy.
4: Add vinegar and soy sauce, until you are satisfied with the flavor. If you aren't too sure how much to use, just use a little bit. You can add it to your own plate later without overflavoring other peoples.
5: Let simmer until rice is ready.
6: Serve rice, then pour curry on the rice.

It's pretty easy.
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Postby tbear on Fri May 21, 2004 3:22 am

MaxJenius wrote:Ack... Oh okay, here's my recipe.

....I suggest oriental rice.....


Oriental rice???? Do you mean regular rice vs. instant/minute rice or the sushi type rice vs. long grain regular rice or basmati rice?

or maybe jasmine rice?

*confused* Please clarify Max....

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BTW, keep this up.. I'm getting good ideas for things to serve at my family reunion that's coming up soon....
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Postby tbear on Fri May 21, 2004 3:28 am

Here's my contribution.... it's from my husband's family.
I find it a lot lighter on the stomach than regular chili.

It's vegetarian, but you can use ground beef instead if you wish:

Chili
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
12 oz. (= 1 pound of ground beef) ground beef substitute
30 ounces kidney beans, fresh cooked or canned
(drain and rinse beans if canned)
2 medium onions (chopped)
2 bell peppers (chopped)
3 medium tomatoes (chopped)
2 small chili peppers (chopped)
3 tablespoons chili powder
3 tablespoons paprika powder
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Postby Allanon on Fri May 21, 2004 4:17 am

tbear wrote:Sometimes dried beef is also referred to as chipped beef...
Chipped beef can also be put into a flour gravy and warmed through then eaten over toast. This is popular in the army and is called SOS - sh** on a shingle.. :D Good luck finding it...


Chipped beef?...why didn't we just say that in the beginning...That, and the SOS, I know about... ;-)

Mom used to make that all the time when we were kids... :o

Thanks guys...
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Postby MaxJenius on Fri May 21, 2004 10:17 pm

tbear wrote:
MaxJenius wrote:Ack... Oh okay, here's my recipe.

....I suggest oriental rice.....


Oriental rice???? Do you mean regular rice vs. instant/minute rice or the sushi type rice vs. long grain regular rice or basmati rice?

or maybe jasmine rice?

*confused* Please clarify Max....


Yes, well... if you go into any oriental store, you can find large bags of the stuff, usually in paper bag packaging.

Here's the deal.

Regular oriental rice isn't talc covered. Apparently American food manufacturers think sticky=bad. It's the talc that makes American rice not sticky.

Ever wonder how us orientals eat rice with chopsticks? Right. The rice is sticky.

Now that isn't to say that all oriental rice is sticky. Some dishes call for fried rice, which is generally brown, non-sticky rice. I'm not fond of that type of rice.
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Postby The Roach on Sat May 22, 2004 2:27 am

MaxJenius wrote:Regular oriental rice isn't talc covered. Apparently American food manufacturers think sticky=bad. It's the talc that makes American rice not sticky.

Ever wonder how us orientals eat rice with chopsticks? Right. The rice is sticky.


Interesting. Over here in Europe, the difference is that the 'sticky' (and IMHO better) rice is not peeled, while the really 'ghrainy' rice is, as they call it, 'parboiled' -- peeled with application of steam. That got introduced as 'Uncle Ben's Rice', and was the start of European people getting into rice as food. That also means that, at least here in Europe, the graina, long-grain rice is preferred, while round grained 'milk rice' is used mostly for desserts, and 'whole grain' rice is used only by 'connoisseurs'.

Never hard about talc being applied to rice. Could be that that's a US specialty, or that it's part of the 'parboiling'.
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Postby nemesis003 on Sat May 22, 2004 2:33 am

off topic for thirty seconds...
hey roach where abouts you from in holland? i have family in Delden and Burgunupstr
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Postby MaxJenius on Sat May 22, 2004 12:50 pm

The Roach wrote:
MaxJenius wrote:Regular oriental rice isn't talc covered. Apparently American food manufacturers think sticky=bad. It's the talc that makes American rice not sticky.

Ever wonder how us orientals eat rice with chopsticks? Right. The rice is sticky.


Interesting. Over here in Europe, the difference is that the 'sticky' (and IMHO better) rice is not peeled, while the really 'ghrainy' rice is, as they call it, 'parboiled' -- peeled with application of steam. That got introduced as 'Uncle Ben's Rice', and was the start of European people getting into rice as food. That also means that, at least here in Europe, the graina, long-grain rice is preferred, while round grained 'milk rice' is used mostly for desserts, and 'whole grain' rice is used only by 'connoisseurs'.

Never hard about talc being applied to rice. Could be that that's a US specialty, or that it's part of the 'parboiling'.


Boy... maybe there should be a History channel on the history of rice. I just remember that bags of oriental rice tends to have the words, "No talc" on it. Dunno... I could be misinformed.

Essentially I suppose my recipie should pretty much say. "Sticky white rice recommended."
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Postby adamjaskie on Sun May 23, 2004 1:23 am

Take some nice, fresh mozzeralla. The good fresh stuff is usually packed in water, and some nice, ripe tomatos, and lots of fresh basil. Slice up the tomatos and the mozzerella and spread them out overlapping on a plate, with leaves of fresh basil between and around everything. Sprinkle with some good balsamic vinigar, and good olive oil.

Another nice thing you can do with rice is risotto. You need arborio rice, which absorbs a lot of liquid. Heat up some chicken broth, then saute some onions in some butter in a pan, until transparent, then dump in the rice. Stir it round until the rice is coated in the butter. Now, pour half a cup of the hot chicken broth into the rice, and stir the rice. Keep stirring. Don't ever stop stirring. When all the chicken broth is absorbed, add another half cup. Keep stirring. When it is all absorbed, add another half cup. Keep adding the broth, half a cup at a time, and waiting for it to be absorbed, stirring CONSTANTLY. Taste the rice to see if it is done. It shlould be cooked through, not hard and chalky in the middle, but still quite firm. If it isn't done, keep adding broth half a cup at a time until it is done. Mix in a good amount of parmesano reggiano cheese, and some other stuff, like cooked shrimp, chopped up tomato, whatever.
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