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Postby EdSaari on Fri Mar 11, 2005 6:07 am

kinako mochi wrote:Just so we understand each other, Pernod IS absinthe, which is heavily anisette, no disrespect intended.


Not quite. Pernod is really imitation Absinthe. The difference is in the inclusion of wormwood (Artemisia absithinthium) ... an herb with psychotropic effect on those who ingest it. Many of the 1880's - 1910 French Artisits regulary drank it. Somewhere in time it fell out of favor with the French government, and was banned ... giving rise to Pernod ... wormwood-less Absinthe.

It is available again ... but 'way (and I do mean 'WAY) expensive.

"Absinthe makes the heart grow fonder."
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Postby kinako mochi on Fri Mar 11, 2005 7:58 am

EdSaari wrote:Not quite. Pernod is really imitation Absinthe.


Pernod is NOT without thujones, or the psychotropic natural extract of wormwood. Modern Pernod (which is $35 for 750 mL, not bad at all), it just meets the EC limit of <10 mg/L (Germany allows 30 mg/L). So it does contain the element that the 19th century creative minds abused to make their creations, but even that is more likely to be the result of mercury and other unscrupulous methods used to make absinthe at the time (it was so popular, making even a questionable 'fee verte' was a dot-com-bubble-like cash cow).

But to get the same effect that Pernod had after WWI (before it was banned in France but now legal at the EC limit), you'd be dead of alcohol poisoning. Which is why I don't have any reservations about drinking it
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Postby EdSaari on Fri Mar 11, 2005 12:25 pm

Well ... I was afraid of being accused of "grinding too fine".

The "Pernod" one would encounter in a Liquor Store in the United States would NOT be Absinthe, but an imitation made without wormwood, and flavored with Anise, among other stuff. A google search for the latest information (I relied on memory) indicates that Pernod *IS* back in the true Absinthe business, along woth a host of others. Thier product, true Absinthe, is labelled differently to make the distinction.

I've read glowing reviews about "Absinthe Suisse La Bleue Clandestine" --- I just might ...
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Postby azalea2 on Fri Mar 11, 2005 1:10 pm

*does websearch*

ah, this looks like it:

Honey and Whisky Ice Cream

300 ml (1 1/3 cups) double cream
60 ml (1/3 cup) whiskey
60 ml (1/3 cup) liquid honey
4 large egg yolks

4-6 servings

1. Whip the cream until it is thick, adding the whisky gradually.
2. Put the honey in a small pan (or a microwave-safe glass) and heat it.
3. At the same time, thoroughly beat the yolks in a bowl.
4. Slowly pour the hot honey into the bowl containing the yolks and carry on beating the mixture until it's pale and thick.
5. Gently fold the egg yolks into the cream and whisky mixture.
6. Put the mixture in a freezer proof container and freeze for three hours minimum. (You can stick it in an ice cream maker, but it comes out fine being put straight in the freezer.)
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Postby kinako mochi on Fri Mar 11, 2005 1:48 pm

EdSaari wrote: I just might ...


At $35 for a bottle, it's even reasonable.

I had to reply to the post, because I had a hard time accepting that what I was drinking was some sort of knockoff. What a racket! Just clouds more whats'-what about absinthe. :)

My buddy James gets his Pernod from France, and he can only order a certain amount at a time, per a certain interval, in order to be legal. Usually a case is enough for casual entertaining, and lasts a long, long time (a serving is about a tall shot glass plus a shorty shot glass of liquid, and that's after you compose it, half-water). James also had a Spanish absinthe called Absente at an earlier party last year (actually the first time I'd tried either brand), and it went down a lot smoother than Pernod, but didn't compose as brilliantly, and gave me the mother of all headaches the next day. But no more thujone content than Pernod (10mg/L).

As I was as afraid yet intrigued with the lore behind absinthe, I did a lot of research on the web and talked on some forums before meeting James at the aforementioned birthday party. He assured me that it's quite legal to consume in the amounts you can legally purchase it (which is what my research turned up), and that there as yet no restrictions pending to restrict it further. Modern Pernod, the bona fide stuff, is no more dangerous for you than vodka, and I can corroborate plus attest that the consequences vs. vodka are far less intense for me the next morning. My last absinthe drink was a few weeks ago, and I was daisy-fresh on wake-up. :)

I also happened upon the new Starbucks coffee liqueur, and it's a smash hit out of the park. Way, way better than Kahlua. If I had to make an alcoholic ice cream, this is the stuff I'd use for coffee liqueur. :)
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Postby Ryalyn on Fri Mar 11, 2005 2:08 pm

Wanders through the thread, picking up the forgotten peeps and arranging them in her basket.

Don't mind me, I'm just bored. I'm more into candy than drinking. Lack of exposure, really.
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Postby kinako mochi on Fri Mar 11, 2005 5:51 pm

*orders Ryalyn a Spezi (mandarin orange Coke)*

Cool. Sweets are more fun to talk about anyway
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Postby Ryalyn on Fri Mar 11, 2005 6:49 pm

Sips her Spezi

Thanks, Kinako! I've got a rather short attention span for things like avitars and computer wallpapers. I end up changing them every month or so. I don't really like this one yet, so I'm thinking of changing it again.

Is this the one you mean, though?

Image
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Postby kinako mochi on Fri Mar 11, 2005 9:09 pm

Yep! That's her! *bloops a bubble around it and saves to hard drive*

Hmm. As long as many of the other avatars remain what they are, I think I'll try the strip out, and see what the reaction is. :)

Since you didn't have the whole image in the avatar, I was sort of expecting something more girly and lacey from the waist down, but that actually works better with jeans and hiking boots. Like an REI fairy! :D

Llewellian should be very familiar with Spezi
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Postby Llewellian on Fri Mar 11, 2005 11:50 pm

he he he kinako... yes i am familiar with "Spezi" (pronounced like the english "Special" only without the "al").

And since i even found that stuff in a vending machine in the youth hostel up in Asahidake-onsen, i do no more wonder about it ;o). It follows me.
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Postby EdSaari on Sat Mar 12, 2005 6:03 pm

kinako mochi wrote:
EdSaari wrote: I just might ...


At $35 for a bottle, it's even reasonable.


While wandering through .... I found ... Cannibis Vodka (!?!?!?!)

- Flavored with hemp seeds. Check it out at [ http://www.absinth.com ]

Hmmm... For the next BYOB party?

Would be interesting to see people trying to light it...
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Postby luchog on Sun Mar 13, 2005 12:29 pm

kinako mochi wrote:Just so we understand each other, Pernod IS absinthe, which is heavily anisette, no disrespect intended.

No, actually, it isn't. Although the first absinthe was created by Emile Pernod, the aperitif currently bearing his name is merely an anise pastis. It contains no wormwood whatsoever, and without the wormwood, it is not absinthe. Although many claim that Pernod is "absinthe without the wormwood", the recipe is entirely different (this is from the info on the Pernod website, as well as numerous other sources); and the current product is not derived from or related to absinthe.

Pernod has begun manufacturing an absinthe recently, but it's marketed as Emile Pernod Absinthe, and does not use the historical recipe. I've not tasted it, but have heard that it's not particularly good.

Also, anise is not the predominant flavouring in historical or most modern absinthes. Spanish absinthe, as well as some French and a few Czech, do use it overwhelmingly (most Spanish absinthes taste of almost nothing else); but most balance it with a number of other herbs, and in some it's almost unnoticible. Historically, it's only one of several primary flavourings; others being wormwood (artemesia absinthum) of course, and typically hyssop, mint, lemon balm, and angelica. Though individual brands vary, most are fairly well-balanced between these flavours; with French and Swiss being typically sweeter, with a bit more emphasis on the mint and lemon balm in the Swiss; Czech-based Sebor being more earthy/herbal and heavily wormwood with little anise (all other Czech brands being unmitigatedly vile and undrinkable).

A US company, in partnership with a Swiss? distiller, is recreating several historical absinthes, with a higher concentration of wormwood than is found in any other commercial product, and more than most Swiss bootleg La Bleue types.

There is a product on the market in the US that *is* absinthe without the wormwood, called Absente, it is complete crap.
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Postby luchog on Sun Mar 13, 2005 1:00 pm

kinako mochi wrote:James also had a Spanish absinthe called Absente at an earlier party last year (actually the first time I'd tried either brand), and it went down a lot smoother than Pernod, but didn't compose as brilliantly, and gave me the mother of all headaches the next day. But no more thujone content than Pernod (10mg/L).


Absente is not absinthe, and contains no thujone (no wormwood).

But to get the same effect that Pernod had after WWI (before it was banned in France but now legal at the EC limit), you'd be dead of alcohol poisoning.


This was true prior to WWI as well. There was not enough thujone content to cause a psychoactive effect without causing serious trauma from the high alcohol content.

Current research has determined, pretty much conclusively, that the symptoms of "absinthium", or "absinthe syndrome" were essentially those of classic alcoholism; combined with the effects of toxic metal pigments (typically cupric sulfate, though some arsenic-based pigments were also used) and methanol-contaminated alcohol commonly used in the cheaper brands.

The thujone in the historical reproduction absinthes produced by Jade Liqueurs far exceeds the 10mg/kg EU convention.

He assured me that it's quite legal to consume in the amounts you can legally purchase it (which is what my research turned up), and that there as yet no restrictions pending to restrict it further.

In fact, most countries are legallizing it, if they haven't already. The US is almost the sole remaining holdout.

One can buy Pernod from one of a number of off-shore websites for personal consumption, and it is legal.

Actually, it's not. It's legal to possess; but not legal to sell or import, and is subject to seizure by customs. However, it has pretty much dropped off their radar by now, and I've not heard of anyone losing a shipment for quite some time (though I've heard it does happen in Texas, for some odd reason).

EdSaari wrote:Somewhere in time it fell out of favor with the French government, and was banned

This was due to the aforementioned "absinthe syndrome", rather than any actual effects of thujone. Even in the highest historical concentrations, there was insufficient thujone to be psychoactive. The unique effects of absinthe resulted as much or more from the overall combination of herbs (all of which have their own physioactive/medicinal properties); than it does from the wormwood alone.

It is available again ... but 'way (and I do mean 'WAY) expensive.

It varies, depending on the brand; but yes, most good absinthe will cost between $45 and $200 a bottle in the US (a large part of that is shipping costs, however).

The best places to buy absinthe are the Sebor Distillery for Sebor absinthe, and Liqueurs de France for Jade and various French absinthes. Spanish and (unfortunately) Czech absinthes can be found through The Fine Spirits Corner in Spain, but are mostly not worth bothering with. Czech is crap, and the Spanish are so overwhelmingly anise that you'd be better off just drinking Pernod, Anisette, or Ouzo; since they're essentially the same flavour, and much cheaper. Unfortunately, there is no longer any good source for La Bleue type absinthes.
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Postby kinako mochi on Sun Mar 13, 2005 4:47 pm

Hmm. Let me get with James for some clarification. He's not normally one to take truth on claim (he's a member of a skeptics society here in AZ, if that's any indication). I'll get back with you. Most of what was said made sense, I'm clarifying whether or not what I drank was absinthe, and not anise pastis, and some of the anisette claims. ;)
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Postby kinako mochi on Mon Mar 14, 2005 9:15 pm

Luchog, your research was spot-on.

The Pernod I drank was not Emile Pernod, and it IS frighteningly expensive, which would verify EdSaari's claim. It does not exceed the EU limit, and the regular Pernod does not use wormwood.

As I stated before though, I don't drink absinthe for the thujones, and I don't wish to be some rebel by taking advantage of a customs oversight. The Pernod I do compose does turn a lovely green as in antiquity (the fee verte is not due to wormwood content, but natural oils), and it still mysteriously does not give me a hangover in any quantity (well, up to a half-bottle anyway). Whether this has to do with any wormwood content is academic. The Absente I drank did give me a massive headache, which would be consistent with how true absinthes treat their imbibers. But did I see Technicolor, write-in-real-time movies as I closed my eyes? Nah. Will I pick up the Pernod I drank again? Most definitely. The Absente? Prolly not. Will I spend nearly $200 for Emile Pernod, to say I drank absinthe with wormwood? Flock, no.

If to enjoy absinthe means forsaking wormwood toxin in exchange for modern acceptance, then fine. I don't miss it one bit. Since thujones are related to THC, then they run the risk of showing up on a drug test, one of which I passed just Thursday of last week (they have the tests inside the cups now, can you believe it? Instant go/no-go). Since James is the lead for internet security for a big IT firm here, chances are he wouldn't take any risks on Pernod either.

Great posts, though. I learned a few things I didn't know before. :)
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Postby luchog on Tue Mar 15, 2005 11:34 am

kinako mochi wrote:As I stated before though, I don't drink absinthe for the thujones, and I don't wish to be some rebel by taking advantage of a customs oversight.

Nobody drinks absinthe for the thujones alone, since the concentration isn't enough to be psychoactive, even historically; though in the small quantities they do have a system tonic effect and is a traditional medicinal herb.
and it still mysteriously does not give me a hangover in any quantity (well, up to a half-bottle anyway). Whether this has to do with any wormwood content is academic.

Hangovers are caused predominantly by dehydration. They can also be caused/exacerbated by drinks that contain various contaminants. Sugary drinks are more likely to cause hangovers, because the sugar content increases the dehydration (your body requires a lot of water to digest the sugars, and if you don't drink water, it pulls it from the bloodstream and tissues).
The Absente I drank did give me a massive headache, which would be consistent with how true absinthes treat their imbibers.

Actually, that's not consistent. True absinthe (which Absente is not), does not cause exacerbated hangovers, and the herbal content has been known to decrease the severity. It's the high alcohol content combined with sugar that causes hangovers in those who do not drink sufficient water with it.

Cheap absinthe (like most Czech stuff) can cause exacerbated hangovers, primarily due to the high sugar content and contaminants resulting from the poor-quality ingredients and distillation process.

Allergies to any of the herbal ingredients can also cause hangover-like symptoms.

Your Absent hangover was likely the result of the high sugar content, and poor-quality ingredients. What you eat and drink along with it can also make a huge difference.
Nah. Will I pick up the Pernod I drank again? Most definitely. The Absente? Prolly not. Will I spend nearly $200 for Emile Pernod, to say I drank absinthe with wormwood? Flock, no.

Drinking absinthe is a matter of taste. Spending $50 or $100 or $200 a bottle is no different than spending a similar amount on vintage single-malt Scotch whisky. Some people are happy with the cheap stuff, others are connoisseurs and buy the expensive stuff.

If to enjoy absinthe means forsaking wormwood toxin in exchange for modern acceptance, then fine. I don't miss it one bit. Since thujones are related to THC, then they run the risk of showing up on a drug test, one of which I passed just Thursday of last week (they have the tests inside the cups now, can you believe it? Instant go/no-go). Since James is the lead for internet security for a big IT firm here, chances are he wouldn't take any risks on Pernod either.

Um... I don't know where you heard that, but thujones are not closely related to THC, and cannot cause false positives on a standard EMIT test. This is an old misconception based on a misunderstood chemical structure. They are both, to some extent, terpinoids; but have dramatically different overall makeups. THC does not contain any thujone-like structures or full terpene rings; whereas thujone containes a modified terpene ring. Thujone is far more closely related to menthol (the primary flavouring in peppermint) than it is to THC. The only real link between them is that thujone and THC can act on some of the same receptors in the brain.

Also, thujone is present in similar concentrations in other commonly used herbs like sage, as well as medicinal herbs like cedarleaf (yellow cedar).

Incidentally, thujone is used in a number of over-the-counter products, such as Vick's Vaporub.

More info on thujone and THC: http://www.erowid.org/ask/ask.cgi?ID=2936
More info on thujone: http://www.erowid.org/chemicals/absinthe/absinthe_info3.shtml
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Postby kinako mochi on Tue Mar 15, 2005 12:53 pm

Hmm. Goes to show that THC and thujone information should be more thoroughly researched before any claims can be made. Good links, too.

My issues are these:

-- As a soldier in Europe, I both consumed many and high amounts of different alcoholic beverages, and discovered very different effects from each of them. For example, my choice at the time was Jose Cuervo dark tequila, which gave a slight headache but a pronounced lowering of inhibition, particularly with the fight-or-flight instinct. Vodka of all kinds gave a heavy hangover and painful headaches. Wine, especially red, gave the worst vertigo and disorientation. None of these had any thujone content, natch. But I drank Pernod, which also does not contain thujones, yet I suffered none of the ill effects much lower alcohol-content liquors had, under the same circumstances, with an older, less-efficient liver and lower metabolism (my age in Europe was 19-22, my age now 35). Why is this? It certainly cannot be attributed solely to sugar and alcohol content alone, or all spirits would have the same effect
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Postby Llewellian on Tue Mar 15, 2005 2:58 pm

Well... i dunno why it was banned... but i bet it had something to do with the widespread and allowed (better: tolerated) consume of kokaine, opium, hemp and morphine in the 17th and 18th century. As far as i know the history of druglaws in germany, they were alltogether banned in the beginning 19th century.

As far as drinking concerns me:

Beer (the german, not the watery american) gives me a hangover and i am drunk very fast.

If i can choose... its Vodka Lemon... that i can drink the whole evening, getting drunk very slow and with no aftereffects in the morning.

When Wine...then i prefer californian Zinfandel or Southafrican Stellenbosch, both Cabernet Sauvignon. But i have to follow the rule, not to mix it up with any other alcoholic drinks - thats deadly on me ;o), gives me really a worse hangover....

Anyway, thats really seldom - i hate it to be drunk and i am old enough to know about the effects, my level and how to avoid to get to it.... mostly i am the driver ;o), so i get my Coke the whole evening free...
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Postby azalea2 on Tue Mar 15, 2005 4:43 pm

I thought there was something about wormwood being toxic? (But then again, aren't most hallucinogens toxic if the dose is too large? Hallucinations being a toxic effect, right?)

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Postby Llewellian on Tue Mar 15, 2005 11:52 pm

Well, if you follow the cite of Paracelsus - rude translated - "The dosis makes something toxic".

Even Water could be toxic if you drink too much of it (more than 15 litres a day)...

It always depends on the intake ;o).

And Hallucinations could be a toxic effect, but it could also come through a normal chemical inbalance in your brain...(the best hallucinations i ever had came through a shortage of sleep when i was awake for about 89 hours during a chat contest for the Guiness Book of Records - too bad we were beaten three weeks later by another group with 105 hours).
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Postby luchog on Wed Mar 16, 2005 11:24 am

kinako mochi wrote:Hmm. Goes to show that THC and thujone information should be more thoroughly researched before any claims can be made. Good links, too.

Actually, thujones are fairly well understood at this point. THC is better understood than many, particularly in the US government, would have us believe; but could still use a lot more research.

-- As a soldier in Europe, I both consumed many and high amounts of different alcoholic beverages, and discovered very different effects from each of them. For example, my choice at the time was Jose Cuervo dark tequila, which gave a slight headache but a pronounced lowering of inhibition, particularly with the fight-or-flight instinct. Vodka of all kinds gave a heavy hangover and painful headaches. Wine, especially red, gave the worst vertigo and disorientation. None of these had any thujone content, natch. But I drank Pernod, which also does not contain thujones, yet I suffered none of the ill effects much lower alcohol-content liquors had, under the same circumstances, with an older, less-efficient liver and lower metabolism (my age in Europe was 19-22, my age now 35). Why is this? It certainly cannot be attributed solely to sugar and alcohol content alone, or all spirits would have the same effect…

There are a wide range of factors involved. Flavorings and other trace substances can have a significant effect, particulary if one is sensitive or allergic to them. Wine in particular is known to cause problems for those who are sensitive to the tannins, as are various other liquors which are aged in oak barrels (like anejo tequila, rum, scotch, etc.). Other contaminants can also cause or magnify hangovers; as well as trigger other responses (the linking of tequila with rage/violence/fight-or-flight responses is a very common one). Vodka, depending on the distiller, can contain a number of trace contaminants that can cause problems for those sensitive to them. And things like what foods you eat, the state of your body at the time, etc. can also contribute to the reactions you get.

Herbal liqueurs like Pernod can often mitigate hangover symptoms. Absinthe itself was originally created as a medicinal tonic, and it's medicinal properties were the impetus for its quick popularity. Modern Pernod pastis contains many similar herbs. A faster metabolism can also contribute to increased hangover potential, since the alcohol hits the system faster and harder, and more likely to cause dehydration.

Incidentally, modern Pernod, and many other herbal liqueurs like juniper-flavoured gin, Chartreuse, and Jaegermeister, do contain trace amounts of thujones from some of their flavouring herbs (most commonly Mugwort, Juniper berries, and Hyssop). It is also present in some "bitters" flavorings.
-- If thujones were never of a high enough concentration to contribute to the psychotrpoic effects of lore, why is the wormwood in particular still banned?

It was originally banned because of a misunderstanding due to the poor quality, and highly politicized, science of the time; and contaminants in cheaper and bootleg grades. It remains technically banned in a very few countries due to government inertia and adherence to outdated (and disproven) information. Something the US government is notorious for. AAMOF, at this point in time, I believe that the US is the only place where it's still officially banned. It's legal in Canada and nearly all western Europe. I don't know about its status in the Russian Federation, or most of the Baltic States; but I'm willing to bet it's legal there as well.

Incidentally, wormwood is not banned at all; only absinthe. And at this point, the absinthe ban appears to be almost completely unenforced in the US. Legally prohibited, but de facto permitted. Wormwood (dry herb, oil, or tincture) can be purchased in many health and herbal medicine shops.

And why, with obvious advances in quality control since c. 1880, are they still outlawed to a neglible amount…?

The aforementioned government inertia and adherence to outdated information is a good explanation for just about anything of this nature.

Plus, it's actually not a negligible amount, historically. Recent analyses of vintage absinthe produsts (most notably, samples of an original 1910 Pernod Fils absinthe, and several Swiss variants dating from the same period) shows that the thujone level is consistently lower than the modern EU limit of 35mg/L (for bitters). Even under ideal laboratory conditions, the maximum thujone levels possible are roughly 60mg/L; nowhere near the 100-200mg/l previously claimed. Modern testing shows historical concentrations ranging from negligible to 25mg/L.

Some of the cheaper and bootleg grades may have contained higher concentrations, due to the use of oil of wormwood rather than distillation of wormwood herb. (A practice still used today by "home" absinthe brewers, usually idiot goth/vampire/SCAdian kids who download the recipes from the internet, and drink the stuff to look cool).

Here is a good source of info on the legal history and chemistry of absithe: http://www.feeverte.net/thujone.html
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Postby azalea2 on Wed Mar 16, 2005 11:32 am

luchog wrote:... government inertia and adherence to outdated (and disproven) information. Something the US government is notorious for.


Aye. You can sure say that again. :-?
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Postby luchog on Wed Mar 16, 2005 11:41 am

Llewellian wrote:Well... i dunno why it was banned... but i bet it had something to do with the widespread and allowed (better: tolerated) consume of kokaine, opium, hemp and morphine in the 17th and 18th century. As far as i know the history of druglaws in germany, they were alltogether banned in the beginning 19th century.

Actually, it was due primarily to the work of one French doctor, who was a rabid prohibitionist, and racist; and attempted to equate the use of absinthe with the degeneration of the "French race". He also mistakenly separated the effects of chronic absinthe use with the effects of chronic alcoholism in general (the symptoms were pretty much identical); and didn't allow for differences in symptoms among the poorer classes being caused by the toxic heavy metal colouring agents (mainly Copper Green aka cupric acetate -- which I mistakenly referred to in an earlier post as cupric sulfate, which is blue -- and antimony trichloride). He also didn't allow for the methanol and other contaminants common to the lower grade alcohols used in cheaper brands of absinthe.

azalea2 wrote:I thought there was something about wormwood being toxic?

Only at levels several times higher than that found in absinthe or bitters. As Llewellian said, it's all about the dosage. Anything is potentially toxic if you ingest enough of it.

The LD50 for thujone in rats is 35mg per kg of body weight per day. Translate that to humans, and it is pretty much impossible to kill yourself with absinthe. However, overuse of pure wormwood oil can have a significant deletorious effect on the liver, and some idiots do make a sort of pseudo-absinthe using vodka or other liquor, and wormwood oil (which tastes amazingly foul).
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Postby EdSaari on Fri Apr 01, 2005 5:24 am

OK ... "Are You Curious" ... not NECESSARILY limited to "absinthe" ...

I have just made a wonderful discovery ... wildly useful in my figure study photography.

A word ...

Imagine Ancient Greece, at the time of Praxiteles... A bunch of sculptors, hanging around the local wine bar (no coffee yet), making small talk about the quailty of the latest shipment of Boeotian eels, and describing their models.
Aristophenes must have used this to describe Lampito ...

"Callipygian"

This wil be useful in the ads I post on the bulletin boards in Art Supply stores ... "Fine Art Photographer Seeking CALLIPYGIAN Model..."

I could tell you what it means - but it would better that you should look it up for yourselves... !
:roll:
Carpe Erratum!!!
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Postby ajax on Fri Apr 01, 2005 12:02 pm

That is a fun word! I wonder if there are similar high-toned words for other body parts...

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