"Hear" we go again.... Sd'A redux - Book I

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"Hear" we go again.... Sd'A redux - Book I

Postby K A H on Fri Feb 27, 2004 1:36 am

You were perhaps expecting me to post about something else? Surely you've learned by now. :P

But anyway, I bring news of small to medium-sized import, hot on the coat tails of the first update of "Avalon" in several weeks (three cheers for Sir Josh! Hap hap! Huzzah! Hap hap! Huzzah! Hap hap! Huzzah!). Specifically, I have finally managed to get around to putting on record the revised version of Deirdre's character sketch, and I am thus able to present, in what I anticipate will be its final form, the first half of "Souvenirs d'Avalon".

(Note: Spaceman42's homepage is still down. I know he's out there somewhere, I posted to this thread earlier today and when I logged out he was listed as the most recent poster to the CRfH!!! forum, the second most active Keen forum. Paging Kelvin Palm, are you out there? Is the demise of your homepage permanent?)

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[url=http://www.acc.umu.se/~maswan/avalon/KAH/1_Caprice_Hel%e9ne_Richer.mp3]1. Caprice. (Hel
Last edited by K A H on Sun Feb 29, 2004 12:40 am, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby Harlenna on Fri Feb 27, 2004 7:16 pm

Why don't I have these all downloaded and burned onto a CD yet??

Riiight, I'm an idget! d'oh!

Where are the other ones!!! Went forum diving for them and I couldn't find them......c'mon Spaceman42, rescue them for us! It isn't fun only having a few bits of KAH's amazing music.
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Postby K A H on Sat Feb 28, 2004 12:27 am

*nudges topic to top of list* There are now links to the other five pieces in Book I. The only ones in Book II available on Matias' archive are the pieces for Ceilidh, Joe, and Alison, as well as the Finale - the pieces for Cecil, Iain, and Nancy and the harpsichord version of Alison's piece are only available online on Spaceman42's page (as is the sheet music). Hopefully his homepage will return - if not, I'll put as many of the missing MP3s into the space Minh has kindly allotted me in his FTP directory as I can fit into it (I doubt I can fit those three and the new version of the Fantaisie, I should point out).

And Harlenna, thanks as ever for the complimentary words. :D

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Postby Mravac Kid on Sat Feb 28, 2004 6:39 pm

Hmm, there's starting to be a surplus of Sd'A on my computer, I'll need to sort it out, and write down where each piece goes and what to do with it :)
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Postby Spaceman42 on Sat Feb 28, 2004 7:45 pm

I just noticed that. I'm going to have to contact the server operator, I guess, but right now I have no clue exactly what is going on.
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Postby K A H on Sat Feb 28, 2004 10:00 pm

Spaceman42 wrote:I just noticed that. I'm going to have to contact the server operator, I guess, but right now I have no clue exactly what is going on.


Well, I hope the MP3s haven't caused the problem (shutdown due to excessive bandwidth consumption? But that's improbable given that there can't have been many people downloading them in recent months - any interested persons probably downloaded them long ago) - if they have, let me know and I'll see if I can make alternate hosting arrangements. And if push comes to shove, I'll just buy a stack of blank CDs and burn them on request! :)

Edit: The Sd'A MP3s have been moved down a directory to accommodate some other MP3s a colleague is generously burning onto a CD for me (I need to buy a new CD burner some time soon; the one I have now produces nice coasters but little else). For the interested, these MP3s include the Processional and Recessional I penned for a friend's wedding back in January. Final Fantasy fans will recognise two of the tunes woven into the Processional - the "Bridge Theme" from the first game, and Celes' theme from the sixth game (at the behest of the bride; I must confess to disliking the game myself). It also includes the Anglican hymn "O God, our help in ages past" and Rachmaninov's "church bells" motif (really just a descending scale). The Recessional is written in the style of Elgar's "Pomp and Circumstance" marches, particularly No.4 in G major.

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Postby K A H on Sun Feb 29, 2004 1:57 pm

*nudges topic again* Some people did request an MP3 of the Processional alluded to in the above post; hence I'm bumping this topic again for those that wish to hear it. (The Recessional may also be of interest; the other three MP3s somewhat less so, as one of them is just a performance of the fifth iteration of the Promenade theme in Pictures at an Exhibition by Mussorgsky, and the other two contain in-jokes which only people who attended the wedding are liable to understand.)

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Postby Gigafreak on Sun Feb 29, 2004 3:01 pm

Downloading... Playing...

Very well done! The bridge theme implies a "journey just beginning" attitude for the couple, and since it was also used as the ending for many Final Fantasies, it also implies a "happily ever after" conclusion. I like what this suggests about the future of the bride and groom.

Personally, if in the improbable event that I get married, I'd love to pull a gimmick where the bride marches down the aisle with a lookalike and then I get up from the organ... But then again, I don't practice much these days, so I doubt that I'd have the skill to perform a wedding march even if I do score a lady.


Tempting though it was to play No.1 in D major and pretend it was a graduation ceremony instead, good taste prevailed. (There, at least.)

And in the rehearsals for my middle school graduation, the teachers tried having us take one step at a time, girls next to boys, so it did look like we were all getting married to Pomp and Circumstance No. 1.
But good taste prevailed there too, after a few more rehearsals. Instead, we walked "steadily and purposefully." (And looked like idiots who shouldn't be graduating.)
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Postby Spaceman42 on Sun Feb 29, 2004 8:45 pm

Apparently the server /ought/ to be back up tomorrow. I'll put the new stuff up when it's up again.
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Postby K A H on Mon Mar 01, 2004 11:22 pm

Gigafreak wrote:Downloading... Playing...

Very well done! The bridge theme implies a "journey just beginning" attitude for the couple, and since it was also used as the ending for many Final Fantasies, it also implies a "happily ever after" conclusion. I like what this suggests about the future of the bride and groom.

Speaking as an acquaintance of the bride and groom, I can confidently say that any optimism in their future is well founded. (They'd already been a couple for over eight years!)

Personally, if in the improbable event that I get married, I'd love to pull a gimmick where the bride marches down the aisle with a lookalike and then I get up from the organ... But then again, I don't practice much these days, so I doubt that I'd have the skill to perform a wedding march even if I do score a lady.

Hm. If memory serves, it's not actually the groom who trots up the aisle with the bride, it's the person giving her away (usually her father), although as I've only been to one wedding in the last fifteen years, my judgement is not necessarily to be believed. (It's possible I may attend a few more in the near future as most of my graduate school classmates have been involved with their significant others since the Pleistocene and are just waiting for some semblance of financial stability. (In contrast to I, who has not been involved at all since the Pleistocene and would be lucky to ever achieve financial stability.)) Mind you, even taking that into account there would need to be a lookalike somewhere in the process. But that's another thought for another time, methinks. (Mealsothinks you're probably a bit young to be thinking of this anyway! :))

And in the rehearsals for my middle school graduation, the teachers tried having us take one step at a time, girls next to boys, so it did look like we were all getting married to Pomp and Circumstance No. 1.

For a middle school graduation!? Not sure what I make of the image of dozens of 14-year-old couples in a mass marriage ceremony.... :-?

But good taste prevailed there too, after a few more rehearsals. Instead, we walked "steadily and purposefully." (And looked like idiots who shouldn't be graduating.)

In other words, like every graduating class that has ever marched to Elgar. :D

Spaceman42 wrote:Apparently the server /ought/ to be back up tomorrow. I'll put the new stuff up when it's up again.

Well, keep us posted - and, as always, thank you very much for hosting these; I hope it's not costing you anything!

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Postby Doctor Emmit Brown on Mon Mar 01, 2004 11:33 pm

Hey this is a cool marriage piece. I don't recognise the bridge part, but I do know Celes's Opera theme. Not sure I'd want it at my wedding, but it's certaily a nice song to listen to.
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Postby Galvatron56 on Tue Mar 02, 2004 12:40 am

K A H wrote:Final Fantasy fans will recognise two of the tunes woven into the Processional - the "Bridge Theme" from the first game, and Celes' theme from the sixth game (at the behest of the bride; I must confess to disliking the game myself).


I recognize the prevailing theme of the processional from Final Fantasy II (US release), the one with Cecil, Kane, Rosa, etc.

I can't say that I have ever heard the bridge theme from the first game, nor did I catch the reference until I downloaded the song and listened to it.

That explains why I didn't reply before.

It's really tempting to use that as wedding music for some people I know. Too bad the biggest Final Fantasy Fan I know is already married.

It's almost as tempting as the thought of playing the "Throne Room" piece from the first Star Wars movie instead of "Here Comes the Bride", just to see if anyone really notices the difference.
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Postby StudioPC on Tue Mar 02, 2004 1:08 am

I'm just going to wait until the final versions are up. Final as in, no more, that's it. No more revisions.
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Postby tappel on Tue Mar 02, 2004 3:35 am

This is just unbelievably good.

I'd appreciate it if you could make an updated in-depth version of the liner notes, for the Fantaisie, at least.

And, if you are going to release the pieces on an audio-cd or cd-r, performed by yourself or by a professional, I'm sure as hell going to get it.

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Postby Spaceman42 on Tue Mar 02, 2004 12:31 pm

No idea when it's going to be back up, though hopefully soon. The op is having troubles with... the DNS company, I think. Anyway...

Um. About the Japonaise? Y'might want to try looking up Shoukichi Kina - especially his one song, Jing Jing. Very garage-band-like in feel, at least to me. He's Okinawan, so his music isn't very representative - but it does give an idea. A better representative sample - something you could draw on for structures - might be Takehisa Takatsuki's 'Beauty in Kyoto' - the piano solo version, that is, from the album of the same name.

They might be difficult to find, though, so I can host mp3s of them for a while - that, is as soon the %$#@*&< server is working again. Gargh.
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Postby K A H on Tue Mar 02, 2004 8:32 pm

Doctor Emmit Brown wrote:Hey this is a cool marriage piece. I don't recognise the bridge part, but I do know Celes's Opera theme. Not sure I'd want it at my wedding, but it's certaily a nice song to listen to.

I suspect the only wedding at which it will ever be performed has already taken place - the groom is an aspiring video game columnist whose favourite game happens to be Final Fantasy 4 (II in the original US numbering, before too many people caught on to the untranslated games for Square to be able to pretend it was the second game), while the bride requested Celes' theme specially (for personal reasons, I'm told). Really, were it to be used again, both members of the bridal couple would need to be as rabid fans of the earlier games in the series as these two were. Possible, but improbable. (Certainly wouldn't appear were I to marry.)

Galvatron56 wrote:I recognize the prevailing theme of the processional from Final Fantasy II (US release), the one with Cecil, Kane, Rosa, etc.

I can't say that I have ever heard the bridge theme from the first game, nor did I catch the reference until I downloaded the song and listened to it.

That explains why I didn't reply before.

*nods* The reason it's sometimes referred to as the "bridge theme" is owing to the fact that its first appearance in a Final Fantasy game ever was in the first game for NES from 1987 (translated into English around 1990), when the Light Warriors are crossing the recently re-built bridge north of Coneria. To my knowledge, it wasn't used in the second game at all; in the third, it was used during the "opening" credits after the defeat of the first boss. It wasn't until the fourth game that its use in the closing credits really took off.

(And, of course, in the fourth game, its first appearance is when Cecil and Kain are crossing the drawbridge of Castle Baron to head for Mist. There, also, it could be dubbed the "bridge theme".)

It's really tempting to use that as wedding music for some people I know. Too bad the biggest Final Fantasy Fan I know is already married.

It's almost as tempting as the thought of playing the "Throne Room" piece from the first Star Wars movie instead of "Here Comes the Bride", just to see if anyone really notices the difference.

Might work better in place of Mendelssohn's "Wedding March", which is usually used as the recessional - the openings are nearly identical.

I believe one of the Forum-goers here (RJ Shep, if memory serves) jested that he wanted to use the Imperial March as the bridal processional at his wedding. At the wedding at which I played in January, during my "reading", I joked that I wanted to use the Funeral March from Chopin's Piano Sonata No.2 as the processional (hence its appearance at the beginning of _Track_5_Reading.mp3, prior to a rendition of the piece I actually played as a "reading", the Prelude from Debussy's Suite bergamasque.)

StudioPC wrote:I'm just going to wait until the final versions are up. Final as in, no more, that's it. No more revisions.

Well, I'd have to say the versions of the pieces above are probably final (although the Rhapsodie is in two pieces - the full version will either appear on the CD or, if it becomes apparent there will never be a CD, some time in the next year or so).

tappel wrote:This is just unbelievably good.

I'd appreciate it if you could make an updated in-depth version of the liner notes, for the Fantaisie, at least.

Hopefully I'll have time soon. If every picture tells a story, the Fantaisie, as a musical picture, certainly tells a story (though, of course, I'm not the author of said story - that would be Sir Josh).

And, if you are going to release the pieces on an audio-cd or cd-r, performed by yourself or by a professional, I'm sure as hell going to get it.

-tappel

Well, thank you. :)

Spaceman42 wrote:No idea when it's going to be back up, though hopefully soon. The op is having troubles with... the DNS company, I think. Anyway...

Aie. Well, thanks for the update, at any rate. Please keep us posted. :)

Um. About the Japonaise? Y'might want to try looking up Shoukichi Kina - especially his one song, Jing Jing. Very garage-band-like in feel, at least to me. He's Okinawan, so his music isn't very representative - but it does give an idea. A better representative sample - something you could draw on for structures - might be Takehisa Takatsuki's 'Beauty in Kyoto' - the piano solo version, that is, from the album of the same name.

They might be difficult to find, though, so I can host mp3s of them for a while - that, is as soon the %$#@*&< server is working again. Gargh.

I'll keep your recommendation in mind, though while I was a bit embarrassed at the time by the non-Japanese nature of the Japonaise, I do think the piece works somehow. (Recently, I decided a subconscious influence was probably Dvorak's "American" string quartet (No.12 in F major) of all things - many of the melodies therein are pentatonic, using the Chinese pentatonic scale rather than the Japanese one.) It's the one piece I still listen to on a regular basis.

And besides, I'm not sure I have the patience to re-write that and the end of the Ballade (which needs to be toned down) and the Fantaisie Canadienne (which is now massively anti-climactic) and the Entr'acte to the second book (which now exists in my head but not on paper).

Though if its dedicatee also feels it needs an overhaul, I may consider it (it's the one piece, more than any other, that was written as an homage to someone besides Sir Josh). Again, thanks for the recommendations.

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Postby Galvatron56 on Wed Mar 03, 2004 12:25 am

Well, you might want to contribute a certain amount of the non-Japanese-ness of Japonaise to what I like to call "The Mikado" factor.

Gilbert and Sullivan's "The Mikado" is a complete travesty if you are looking for an accurate portrayal of Japanese life. It is, however, very interesting if looked upon as the attempt of Victorian Age British folk to portray what Japan might be like, based on limited information.

Are not both the piece's composer and Nancy herself, to an extent, guessing at what is really Japanese? I would think of both Nancy, and the piece, as being as Japanese like as they can be, without really being so.

Nancy speaks Japanese and has a Japanese family. Yet, I believe that she was born and raised in Canada.

Does that make sense?

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Postby GrassyNoel on Wed Mar 03, 2004 12:47 am

Galvatron56 wrote:Well, you might want to contribute a certain amount of the non-Japanese-ness of Japonaise to what I like to call "The Mikado" factor.

Gilbert and Sullivan's "The Mikado" is a complete travesty if you are looking for an accurate portrayal of Japanese life. It is, however, very interesting if looked upon as the attempt of Victorian Age British folk to portray what Japan might be like, based on limited information.


I thought it was G&S satirising Victorian high society and attitudes while setting the whole thing in Japan to cover their arses in case some important personage recognised himself on stage :) Jonathan Swift was also a master satirist who set his works 'elsewhere' to protect himself from lawsuits.
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Postby Galvatron56 on Wed Mar 03, 2004 12:57 am

You got me there. That might be the case too.

Maybe I just keep thinking of the movie "Topsy Turvey" too much. It seemed like they were picking up some aspects of Japanese culture, and inserting British elements for everything else.

I have no idea if it is specific parody of certain people in British Society.

Just like I don't recognize any of the specific people that Johnathan Swift might be parodying. I do, however, get the gist of the type of behavior that he is parodying. And I can't say that it would be limited to just British society.

Is anyone else here on the BBS familiar with both works?
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Postby GrassyNoel on Wed Mar 03, 2004 1:25 am

"As Gilbert's central joke ... The Mikado's Japanese setting is a sham, for each character plays an English stock figure thinly disguised in oriental garb ..."

Stephen Jay Gould, The True Embodiment of Everything That's Excellent, from his last collection of essays, I Have Landed.

Gould was a palaeontologist, but also an expert on G&S from a very early age.
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Postby Spaceman42 on Wed Mar 03, 2004 9:06 pm

Well, the page is up again. I have no idea when I'll be able to update the page, though, so I'll just put them in a directory [not right now, mind you - it's late, and CuteFTP tends to crash when left untended] and leave them there pending an update. I'll probably also upload mp3s of the songs I mentioned.
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Postby K A H on Sat Mar 06, 2004 10:03 am

Spaceman42 wrote:Well, the page is up again. I have no idea when I'll be able to update the page, though, so I'll just put them in a directory [not right now, mind you - it's late, and CuteFTP tends to crash when left untended] and leave them there pending an update. I'll probably also upload mp3s of the songs I mentioned.

Good news indeed. And, as ever, thank you very much for hosting the MP3s, as well as for giving them publicity in your signature.

I meant to reply to the rest of this a few days ago but the forum kept crashing, as it has been prone to doing lately (lately meaning the last three years or so).

Galvatron56 wrote:Well, you might want to contribute a certain amount of the non-Japanese-ness of Japonaise to what I like to call "The Mikado" factor.

Gilbert and Sullivan's "The Mikado" is a complete travesty if you are looking for an accurate portrayal of Japanese life. It is, however, very interesting if looked upon as the attempt of Victorian Age British folk to portray what Japan might be like, based on limited information.

The most blatant reference to this, of course, is in the opening chorus, "If you want to know who we are", in which they refer to themselves as being seen "on many a vase and jar, on many a screen and fan" - which is probably where G&S got most of their ideas of how to portray Japan (though I believe there had been some sort of exhibition of Japanese culture around the time they wrote it, as depicted in Topsy-Turvy).

It's no accident that the main "Japanese" influence in the Japonaise is that first chorus in "The Mikado", particularly the unison instrumental introduction - and even Sullivan got it slightly wrong, as he uses the five tones of the Chinese scale rather than the Japanese one (I can't remember offhand which five tones form the latter, but they are not, contrary to the Chinese version, spaced 2, 2, 3, 2, 3 in western semitones (and even those are approximations)).

Are not both the piece's composer and Nancy herself, to an extent, guessing at what is really Japanese? I would think of both Nancy, and the piece, as being as Japanese like as they can be, without really being so.

Nancy speaks Japanese and has a Japanese family. Yet, I believe that she was born and raised in Canada.

Well, if Tae's guest series from 2002 is taken as canon - and I believe Sir Josh has said it should be taken as such - her family moved to Canada when she was young, but I seem to remember she has spent more than half her life there.

The difference between the music and its subject being as Japanese as they wish without quite achieving it is that the piece was not quite so directly influenced by dyed-in-the-wool products of the culture - only the diluted versions that made their way across the Pacific (or the great Eurasian land mass).

GrassyNoel wrote:I thought it was G&S satirising Victorian high society and attitudes while setting the whole thing in Japan to cover their arses in case some important personage recognised himself on stage :) Jonathan Swift was also a master satirist who set his works 'elsewhere' to protect himself from lawsuits.

It's that as well, of course. In a few of their operettas, they even follow the Swiftian path of creating fictitious lands in which to set the events that follow (though they're not populated by very small or very large people or caricatures of scientists or vicious, degenerate parodies of humanity in general and intelligent horses). I've said it before and I'll say it again: in a recent production by the D'Oyly Carte company (which appears on stage every year or two, as far as I can tell), this was really hammered home during the entrance of the Mikado in Act II, in which he was dressed in red ermine robes and sported a set of bagpipes on his back, on each pipe of which was draped a Union Jack. And at the back of the stage was a rendition of the Houses of Parliament. All about as Japanese as steak and kidney pie served with vegetables that have been boiled for two hours. :)

Galvatron56 wrote:Maybe I just keep thinking of the movie "Topsy Turvey" too much. It seemed like they were picking up some aspects of Japanese culture, and inserting British elements for everything else.

I think it's probably both. Most of their operettas are satirical in some way (though the satire has long ceased to be relevant in all but one or two, most notably "Iolanthe" with its affectionate poke at the House of Lords), and their audiences, being British themselves, would have most readily recognised jabs at British culture. But there are a few Japanese elements in "The Mikado" as well (Gilbert even wrote some of the libretto in Japanese - probably not grammatically precise Japanese, but Japanese nonetheless).

I have no idea if it is specific parody of certain people in British Society.

Just like I don't recognize any of the specific people that Johnathan Swift might be parodying. I do, however, get the gist of the type of behavior that he is parodying. And I can't say that it would be limited to just British society.

I suspect that, in most cases, both Swift and G&S are satirising segments of the population and not specific people. I know that in Gulliver's Travels (unsurprisingly, the only Swift I've read in its entirety, though I've skimmed his essay on how to trim down the population), sometimes Swift does this by exaggerating the vices of his own society (in the fourth book, of course, and to a lesser extent in the first (most notably in the ridiculous reasons behind the war between Lilliput and Blefuscu), as well as the merciless skewering of the scientists of the day in the third book) or by creating a society that is its polar opposite in nearly every way (which happens in the second book, to an extent). I suspect G&S were aiming their cannons in "The Mikado" at that most popular of targets, their government - absurd laws with equally absurd loopholes, corruption, and so forth. If the characters themselves are caricatures or amalgams of actual people, I don't know who the subjects are offhand.

GrassyNoel wrote:"As Gilbert's central joke ... The Mikado's Japanese setting is a sham, for each character plays an English stock figure thinly disguised in oriental garb ..."

Sometimes not even that (see above). Not that this didn't stop the production from being pulled from the stage during a visit by some Japanese dignitaries a hundred years ago. (I can't remember offhand if the first Japanese audience to see it loved it or took offence.)

Stephen Jay Gould, The True Embodiment of Everything That's Excellent, from his last collection of essays, I Have Landed.

Gould was a palaeontologist, but also an expert on G&S from a very early age.

I presume the title is an allusion to the Lord Chancellor's first patter song (of three, the most for any G&S character) in "Iolanthe". A fun song in an operetta rife with 'em. Didn't know Gould was a connoisseur.

Anyway, dragging this post back on topic briefly, work continues to progress on other parts of the suite not linked to at the beginning of the thread.... and there are a few surprises in store, but I'll keep quiet about them for now. Let's just say there are a few more pieces in the works.... :)

K.A.H.
It might mean it takes me six years to finish my Ph.D., but what's another year? :P
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Postby deanc on Sun Mar 07, 2004 2:58 am

I just finished listening to the new Fantasie.

BRAVO!

Thanks for sharing the fruits of your hours of labor, KAH.
It is definitely VERY appreciated!

BTW, if you decide to hire a professional, which I am personally not sure is necessary :) let the forum crowd know and set up a PayPal account or a place I can send you $ to contribute. It would be my pleasure.

Thanks again.

Dean
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Postby K A H on Mon Mar 08, 2004 8:11 am

deanc wrote:I just finished listening to the new Fantasie.

BRAVO!

Thanks for sharing the fruits of your hours of labor, KAH.
It is definitely VERY appreciated!

And thank you for the compliment. :)

BTW, if you decide to hire a professional, which I am personally not sure is necessary :) let the forum crowd know and set up a PayPal account or a place I can send you $ to contribute. It would be my pleasure.

Aheh.... well, hiring a professional will most certainly be necessary, as there are some contrapuntal passages, most notably in the Fantaisie and the Japonaise, that I cannot play myself but which I feel aid the overall effect of the pieces. But I'll cross that bridge when I come to it.

It may not be for a while, though. Following another burst of creative energy, I've finally decided on the structure for "Souvenirs d'Avalon". A "brief" word of explanation before I post the revised track listing (which will, unfortunately, necessitate two CDs; I'll see how much of a problem that is, if push comes to shove I'll look into making a data CD with the MP3s): it's been my ambition ever since I started writing music semi-seriously as a high school student (the early efforts are long gone) to write a set of twenty-four pieces, one in each major and minor key, following in the tradition of Bach (Well-Tempered Clavier), Chopin (Preludes Op.28, best played as a set), David (Bunte Reihe for piano and violin (later transcribed for piano solo by - who else? - Franz Liszt)), Liszt and Liapunov (the Transcendental Etudes - played as a set, they rather overwhelm the musician and the listener by the halfway mark!), Rachmaninov (Preludes Op.3 No.2, Op.23, and Op.32), and Shostakovich (Preludes Op.34 and Preludes and Fugues Op.87).

And with a transposition or extra introduction here and there, every piece in Sd'A is in a different key. In addition to starting to write sketches for six characters with minimal to medium roles (after which the list of characters for whom a piece would make sense will probably be exhausted), I've also started writing three interludes (scenes set to music, if you will) as well as introductions for the second and third book. The second book is entirely new material and mostly centres on the fringe characters, but as ever, there are some references (though not many - these are fringe characters, after all) to the other pieces. The final version, then, is as much homage to what has remained one of my favourite webcomics through sporadic updates and plot twists that have sent me reeling as it is the end product of one of my longest-standing goals as an amateur composer.

Anyway, the new track listing is as follows (identities of new character sketches withheld, but their identities are generally indicated by the titles and should be easily guessed):

Ouverture. (A major)
1. Caprice. (C major)
2. Rhapsodie. (D major)
Interlude. Chasse. (G minor)
3. Lamentation. (F minor)
4. Intermezzo. (F major)
5. Fantaisie - attacca Finale. Triptyque. (D minor)

Entr'acte. Prélude. (F-sharp major)
6. Nocturne. (B minor)
7. Chanson sans Paroles. (F-sharp minor)
8. Sarabande. (B-flat minor)
Interlude. Fugue à deux sujets. (C-sharp minor)
9. Scherzo. (G major)
10. Étude. (A minor)
11. Passacaille. (A-flat major)

Entr'acte. Scène d'hiver. (D-flat major)
12. Ballade. (E-flat minor)
13. Écossaise. (E-flat major)
14. Humoresque. (B-flat major)
Interlude. Nuit d'été. (C minor)
15. Fughetta. (G-sharp minor)
16. Ronde. (B major)
17. Japonaise. (E minor)
Finale. Fantaisie Canadienne. (E major)

So the Fughetta and Fantaisie Canadienne will be transposed (each down a semitone), while the Ballade will have a new introduction added to it (I'm struggling to find something that fits with the rest of the piece, particularly the opening bars of the current version - however, this will mean the key of the final bars will be more closely related to the key of the opening bars).

One of the new character sketches has already been completed (it almost wrote itself!), and a few more are following hot on its heels (I expect all of them to be short - no more than five minutes and sometimes under three). I just need to find time to write (which might not be easy as academic pressure mounts); I don't anticipate being finished until some time during the summer (hopefully before preparation for my candidacy exam kicks into high gear). At three years in the making, this will probably rank among the greatest investments of time for a single fan interpretation of a webcomic. But it'll be worth it in the end. :)

K.A.H.
I hope!
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Postby Spaceman42 on Mon Mar 08, 2004 7:04 pm

Alright, the new songs are being uploaded to http://nfact.mspencer.net/AHMusix/newstuff pending my next site update. Also there are the two songs I mentioned earlier. I'd post more, but I have a chem prelab to complete.
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